Tag Archives: Georgette Gouveia

The Glass Door by Georgette Gouveia

OUT NOW! The Glass Door by Georgette Gouveia

She is a writer working from home at the height of the pandemic in New York, and trying to outpace her past in a walled garden that is one of the few outlets for her anxiety. He is a grocery delivery man on the frontlines. They communicate only through the glass storm door of her house.

But is it the doorway to a real connection or merely an entrée to her imagination? Call it love in the time of corona.

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Guest post by Georgette Gouveia

What’s a straight woman doing writing homoerotic fiction?

It’s a question I’ve gotten occasionally at public appearances ever since the publication of my novel Water Music in 2013. That book, the first in my series The Games Men Play, is about four gay athletes — two swimmers and two tennis players — and how their rivalries color their personal relationships with one another. I followed that up with The Penalty for Holding (2017), a Lambda Literary Award finalist and JMS Books reissue, about a gay, biracial quarterback’s search for identity in the NFL.

The next two books, published by JMS Books last year — Burying the Dead, a psychological thriller about a tennis player who’s really a Russian agent and assassin, and Daimon, a novel of Alexander the Great — centered on bisexual men, while Seamless Sky, published earlier this year by JMS, is a family drama set around the events of 9/11 with a heterosexual protagonist. What they all have in common are themes of power and rivalry, often the subjects of the sports/culture blog I write.

But why use gay or bisexual men to explore these? Apart from the fact that until recently, only men held any real power, my interest in homoeroticism began with a childhood steeped in the ancient Greeks. They had a custom in which a man in his 20’s would form an attachment to a youth in his teens as part of a finite socialization process that prepared freemen for citizenry and marriage. Meanwhile, the poet Sappho celebrated love between women. So this did not seem unusual to me, particularly as I became fascinated with Alexander the Great, the Greco-Macedonian conqueror of the Persian Empire, whose dissemination of Greek culture paved the way for everything from Christianity to American superpower. Alexander was a lover of both strong women and beautiful men.

Over the years, I made several stabs at stories about male friendships (an unfinished baseball novel Due Seasons) and two rival male movie stars who fall for each other (the unfinished Waterdance.) I was moving toward something I didn’t yet grasp.

What sealed the deal for me, however, was the fan fiction I found online, which inspired Water Music, my first published novel. Here were stories by women for women that explored the uncharted territory — for us at least — of imagining what it must be like for two beautiful men to have sex. I didn’t just find fanfic erotic and titillating, I found it an escape, a release and a validation, as if someone finally understood that little girl in love with the ancient Greeks. I saw these tales as a feminist rallying cry, even if they were about Benedict Cumberbatch being in love with Martin Freeman (Sherlock fanfic) or Spock discovering some very un-Vulcan feelings for Capt. Kirk (Star Trek fanfic) or Novak Djokovic taking up with Rafael Nadal (tennis fanfic).

And yet, I realized that for me, fanfic — however entertaining — was just a station on my way. I didn’t want to fictionalize real people (my childhood hero Alexander being an exception). I wanted to write fiction unencumbered by what an actual contemporary person might be like. Fanfic was the freeing springboard for my homoerotic novels.

They are, though, a kind of cultural appropriation, and cultural appropriation can be frowned upon when the culture you’re appropriating from has been oppressed. All I can say is that in whatever I write, I strive for the psychological truth that is the essence of art.

“Whenever anyone asks you why you write what you do,” a former editor of mine once said, “just tell them that Stephen Crane, who wrote the great war novel The Red Badge of Courage never set foot on a battlefield.”

Throughout history, writers have met their subjects on the bridge of the imagination. I think we still do.

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Seamless Sky by Georgette Gouveia

OUT NOW! Seamless Sky by Georgette Gouveia

Jade Cabral strides into the 21st century as a golden guy. Brilliant and beautiful, with a California cool and a Harvard education, he is poised for wealth and success in New York’s Financial District.

But Jade harbors a secret flaw, a thirst for revenge against Señor Rodriguez, the California landowner who deprived his father – Señor’s out-of-wedlock son, John Virgil — of his family’s rightful inheritance and place in the world. Jade thinks if he succeeds in New York, he can make up for every loss and humiliation his family has endured at the hands of Señor. That searing quest leads him into the arms of Nan Spencer, a lovely, fragile socialite, and to the top of the financial world, the Twin Towers, on September 11, 2001.

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Daimon by Georgette Gouveia

OUT NOW! Daimon by Georgette Gouveia

He was a romantic and a realist, a lover of strong women and beautiful men. And though he was at one time the richest, most powerful man in the world, his most prized possession was a book — Homer’s The Iliad, annotated by his tutor, Aristotle.

Most of all, he was as much a myth as a man and a mystery … even to himself.

When Alexander the Great died in Babylon in 323 B.C. a month shy of his 33rd birthday and after conquering and reordering Persia, he left a sprawling empire and a burning question: What drove him?

Before Alexander, culture flowed East to West. After, it would flow West to East, and we are the heirs of the continuing tension between the two.

In this historical novel, Alexander encounters the only two enemies he cannot defeat: death and time. Surrendering to both, he considers a life that attempted to bridge seemingly irreconcilable opposites — East and West, Persians and Greeks, a brutal father and a ruthless mother, a wily wife and a male soulmate. And above all, a tempered mind and ungovernable passions.

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Burying the Dead by Georgette Gouveia

OUT NOW! Burying the Dead by Georgette Gouveia

Playing off today’s headlines, Burying the Dead serves up a high stakes game of love and death set on the power courts of Washington, DC, and other glittering world capitals.

There Dimitri “Dimi” Orlov is a rising Russian tennis star whose glamorous, globetrotting career provides the perfect cover for his real day job — agent and assassin. Trained by his government from the time he’s discovered in an orphanage, Dimi is assigned to assassinate the president of the United States — a brilliant but arrogant onetime New York prosecutor who’s proved too independent for his Russian backers — by romancing and enlisting his abused first lady, Catherine Darlington.

Dimi courts the lovely, loveless Catherine at Renaissance House, a new cultural center in historic Dupont Circle that’s a front for Russia’s Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR), and at the US Open. There he’s shadowed by CIA agent Mitch Abramson, who has begun to connect the dots. But just as the various matches – Dimi and Catherine, Dimi and Mitch — heat up, Dimi makes a choice that could have his bosses take him out of the game permanently.

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